PDF John Doe õ õ Under the Big Black Sun PDF/EPUB ´ Big Black

Under the Big Black Sun explores the nascent Los Angeles punk rock movement and its evolution to hardcore punk as it’s never been told before Authors John Doe and Tom DeSavia have woven together an enthralling story of the legendary west coast scene from 1977 1982 by enlisting the voices of people who were there The book shares chapter length tales from the authors along with personal essays from famous and infamous players in the scene Additional authors include Exene Cervenka X Henry Rollins Black Flag Mike Watt The Minutemen Jane Wiedlin and Charlotte Caffey The Go Go’s Dave Alvin The Blasters Jack Grisham TSOL Teresa Covarrubias The Brat Robert Lopez The Zeros El Vez as well as scencesters and journalists Pleasant Gehman Kristine McKenna and Chris Morris Through interstitial commentary John Doe “narrates” this journey through the land of film noir sunshine Hollywood back alleys and suburban sprawl—the place where he met his artistic counterparts Exene DJ Bonebrake and Billy Zoom—and formed X the band that became synonymous with and in many ways defined LA punk Under the Big Black Sun shares stories of friendship and love ambition and feuds grandiose dreams and cultural rage all combined with the tattered glossy sheen of pop culture weirdness that epitomized the operations of Hollywood’s underbelly Readers will travel to the clubs that defined the scene as well as to the street corners empty lots apartment complexes and suats that served as de facto salons for the musicians artists and fringe players that hashed out what would become punk rock in Los Angeles


10 thoughts on “Under the Big Black Sun

  1. says:

    This is the best audiobook I have ever listened to


  2. says:

    Disclaimer this review is for the audiobook This is a great fucking book And if you don't listen to the audiobook you're doing yourself a disservice All the chapters are read by the people who were there and experienced it all What a great piece of history told in their own voices John Doe has the perfect tone of voice for this He should become a voice actor or something There's a great Jack Grisham chapter And I wouldn't want to spoil all that sex for youso go listen Do not wait


  3. says:

    This isn't a memoir by John Doe nor is it an oral history like Please Kill Me This is a collection of personal short stories from an array of amazing talented people who came into their own in the centre of the LA punk scene While the overall theme of finding a place they finally felt they belonged is found in each chapter it's the personal memories interactions and how it all shaped them and the art they would create that makes it all fascinatingThis was my first ever audiobook and I'm so happy I chose that way to experience this collection Doe chose some awesome subjects to share their stories and hearing them all share their experiences in their own voice greatly enhanced the book for me I also loved that he made sure to include plenty of incredible women considering how often their contributions have been overlookedOne incredible woman featured in this book is Pleasant Gehman I had the immense pleasure of chatting with her on my podcast and those who wish to hear some fantastic tales from the LA Punk scene can check it out at Muses and Stuff


  4. says:

    As a superfan of LA punk rock I was somewhat let down by Under the Big Black Sun It's not a memoir nor is it an oral history and it's kind of a stretch to call it an anthology It's a loose collection of essays that covers or less the same ground as Forming The Early Days of LA Punk Make The Music Go Bang The Early LA Punk Scene and We Got the Neutron Bomb The Untold Story of LA Punk That's fine The voices collected here all add interesting insights to a story that's been told many times before despite co author Tom DeSavia's claims that LA punk rock is underdocumented Interspersed between these pieces are shorter remembrances by John Doe and DeSavia that add little to the collection I think I would have preferred if they'd stuck to being editors and made it a proper anthology and added voices to the conversation If I sound a bit jaded you can thank Allan MacDonell's Punk Elegies True Tales of Death Trip Kids Wrongful Sex and Trial by Angel Dust and Alice Bag's Violence Girl East LA Rage to Hollywood Stage a Chicana Punk Story which are both real and raw and burst the balloon that would have you believe that the early LA punk scene was a magical time of creativity and diversity There were drugs addicts hustlers prostitutes rapists and rape victims violence against women and STDs aplenty but you won't find any of that here


  5. says:

    One could make a pretty good argument that the LA punk scene of the late '70'searly '80's was every bit as culturally influential as the London and New York punk movements if not so Besides the music SoCal popularized the DIY ethos gave us the art of Raymond Petttibon and the documentaries of Penelope Spheeris It's fairly crying out for a good book about itUnder the Big Black Sun is not that book What is it? A collection of short essays about LA in the late '70's written by several of the musicians and scenesters from those days It's pretty hit or miss Most of theses pieces follow the same narrative and tell the same stories to wit1 I came here when I was 16 and met others like myself who didn't fit in2 The parties were crazy Tomata du Plenty made gross appetizers the Disgraceland Party and we smoked pot with Tony Curtis There's a lot of name dropping going on here3 The music was great The first PlugzWeirdosGerms show I went to was like nothing I'd ever experienced It was so raw4 Drugs and Orange County skinheads came and ruined it for everyone so I moved on There's not a lot of insight into what made punk music from that time and place so powerful The best part of the book is Mike Watt's story of the birth of the Minutemen Written without capital letters and strewn with teenageisms prolly dealio Watt's essay is a tender paean to his best friend and bandmate D Boon who died in a car accident just when the band was about to take off It's funny and heartbreaking


  6. says:

    Great read about the original Los Angeles punk scene Really enjoyed the emphasis on the creativity inclusiveness and intellect of the scene which has always been the most most attractive thing about punk to me rather than just tales of debauch and nihilism although those are scattered throughout as well It offers a very nice counter to all the current hype about the early New York punk scene and successfully documents some great moments illustrating the uniue feel the early LA artists brought to punk while remaining true to the voices of those who participated in creating it Many of the vignettes are touching eulogies to a brief time that left an impact still felt in music and art today


  7. says:

    Instead of a John Doe book this is set up as John Doe curating a book about the LA punk scene The stated objective of the book is that the Los Angeles punk scene of the late 70s doesn’t get enough respect and attention in comparison to the London and New York scenesI admire working towards that end although for me it’s impossible to beat the UK and NYC for depth and uality as well as diversity Still LA is very important For starters Doe’s band X is despite many plaudits still underappreciated As is so many of the bands that former the LA scene the Go Gos Fear TSOL the Weirdos the Dickies the Germs and there is a wealth of diversity and thought Black Randy and the Metro Suad the Blasters the Bags the Polecats the Zeros the Plugz the Screamers and many The book are short pieces –about 20 or so from 15 of the scene’s members musicians journalists film makers Billie Joe Armstrong with the introduction and pieces written by Henry Rollins Exene Cevenka and The best in my opinion were the ones written by Doe and Jane Weidlin and Charlotte Caffey of the Go Gos They really captured that period of youth where you discover others with the same tastes as you and start making towards a scene capturing the energy and the lack of money no car dead end jobs but also as the scene evolves over time I was very inspired to think of my teenage years and early 20s and surely others will be reminded of their local scenes Maybe not everyone we knew ended up on MTV but we were inspired and created and made the scene in our livesMike Watt has an excellent piece which is a fitting tribute to D Boon but also captures that feeling of being a lonely outsider and is written in the captifying way of ‘wattspeak” like only he can El Vez and others pointed out the openness of the scene and that it was not just a white male scene but everyone was eual and the scene was accepting of women gays Latinos and everyoneI found Dave Alvin’s piece worthwhile in that it argues over what punk is If punk is ‘do what you love no matter what’ then the Blasters were indeed punk; but if punk is a haircut or a uniform his band did not fit in The Blasters shared stages with acts as diverse as ueen Fear Los Lobos Bo Diddley and Dwight Yoakam It was cool that Lee Ving had the band’s back and that their rockabilly influenced sound fit in a scene where they did not sound like anyone else I also really appreciated Jack Grisham’s piece Most of the book follows the same thread there was this magical group of outsiders who came together to form art then hardcore came in hard drugs were introduced the scene was violent and testosterone driven Grisham offers a great rebuttal on what drove bands like TSOL and others to do what they did They were coming into a scene that had become the establishment it once railed against Journalist Kristine McKenna and Doe end the book with two pieces that sum up the chapters before McKenna is a great writer though I think she is a bit off with postulating that the scene wouldn’t have been created in world of social media This to me hits a bit too much “Get off my lawn” for me I get her point but scenes involve Now there are blogs sites like Bandcamp kickstarter campaigns guerilla marketing and people across the world with similar tastes can connect and artists like car Seat Headrest can go from home recordings to national stardom without leaving the bedroom Her other contention borders on the “youth is wasted on the young” meme which is mostly true Without being ageist many of her points are valid The young have the time and energy and drive before worrying about bills and families set in and other motivations drive decisions Another point made is that the scene once rebellious and considered something the mainstream would ridicule turned into something that corporations like record labels and MTV embraced because they saw financial implications What was pure art was now being tinged by the greed of Capitalism Doe ties it all together capturing the points where the scene moved from a collection of creative souls to where it loses the plot Go Gos Top 10 success X’s major label signing and national tour Darby Crash’s death These things led to the scene no longer being this pure uncorrupted thing For me this book was really powerful and reminded me so much of my younger years and “the scene” and I think friends of mine would say the same Granted we may not have the level of fame but the scene for us was just as important to shaping our lives To McKenna’s point it was a time that you could get beat up for the way you looked a nostalgia that the alt right apparently wants to bring back When I look at the reviews they seem mixed I think it may help that I know these bands very well For me this book was perfect for what Doe wanted to accomplishI would be remiss if I didn’t end this review with a glowing appreciation of my local library In the last year or so they have brought in not only this book but a bunch of significant music biographies Unfaithful Music Porcelain Trouble Boys How Music Works as well as this book Not to mention a lot of other cool books like Richard Zacks’ Mark Twain book This is an amazing selection that I doubt my Big Box store can compete with Way to go local library


  8. says:

    Fabulous This is an amazing punk rock history I enjoyed it in both formats as an audiobook and as a print book I recommend both formats they each offer different appeals The audiobook was everything I have always wanted from a music biography audiobook each chapter was read by the author of that chapter and there were musical excerpts in between chapters But of course the print book offers a better way to pore over the lyrics and also has great photos We were lucky enough to go the book signing in Austin and we had a chance to chat with John Doe and thank him for this book He was charming as always and also said he hopes to do a follow up book Can't wait


  9. says:

    Totally rad I love these oral history books and it was especially great on audio because I get to learn about a time I didn't get to live through myself and straight from the mouths of the people who were at the center of it Most of the recollections weren't very pretty but that's punk


  10. says:

    Excellent history in a uirky random manner that perfectly suits the subject Many writers co authored the book with John Doe I want to check out The Flesheaters and the Minute Men after hearing Jason and Mike give their accounts of the bands respectively